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University of Wisconsin–Madison

2020 Shadid Award Finalists

Photo of stack of brochures about the Anthony Shadid Award for Journalism Ethics

Announcing four finalists for the 2020 Anthony Shadid Award for Journalism Ethics

The judges for the Anthony Shadid Award for Journalism Ethics are honored to select four remarkable entries as finalists for the 2020 award. The Shadid Award honors journalists who exhibit a strong commitment to ethical journalism by acting with integrity, honoring ethical principles in their reporting or resisting pressure to compromise ethical principles.

“The 2020 recipient will be chosen from four outstanding examples of journalism that married courageous reporting and careful consideration of ethical dilemmas,” said Lucas Graves, associate professor in the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Journalism and Mass Communication and chair of the Shadid Award judging committee. The finalists are:

2020 Finalists

Photo of 2019 Shadid Award winners Julie K. Brown and Emily Michot

Julie K. Brown and Emily Michot (The Miami Herald) at the May 2019 award ceremony for the Anthony Shadid Award for Journalism Ethics in New York City.

“This year’s submissions included stellar examples of powerful reporting from around the country and the world that tackled complex, difficult subjects with real care,” Graves said. “Our four finalists all represent the best of journalism, and we’ve got a difficult choice ahead of us!”

The winner will be announced March 16, 2020 and will receive the award at a ceremony May 13 at the University Club in New York City. (An event registration link will be posted February 19). This award is unique in recognizing the ethical challenges journalists face in their work, including the difficult decisions reporters and editors make to balance the interests of sources, subjects and the public.

Recent winners of the award include the Miami Herald reporters who investigated how wealthy hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein covered up his crimes of molesting and sexually assaulting scores of underage girls and a group of Reuters reporters who exposed the industry that dissects, rents and sells the bodies of the recently deceased.

 

On Dec. 2, 2010, foreign correspondent for the New York Times Anthony Shadid (center) speaks to a group of journalism students in a Vilas Hall classroom at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Shadid is a UW-Madison alumnus and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

On Dec. 2, 2010, foreign correspondent for the New York Times Anthony Shadid (center) speaks to a group of journalism students in a Vilas Hall classroom at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Shadid was a UW-Madison alumnus and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

ABOUT ANTHONY SHADID: The award is named for Anthony Shadid, a UW-Madison journalism alumnus and foreign reporter for the Washington Post and The New York Times. Shadid won two Pulitzer Prizes for his courageous and informed journalism. He died in February 2012 while reporting in Syria.

Shadid had a special connection to the University of Wisconsin-Madison, its School of Journalism and Mass Communication and the Center for Journalism Ethics. He sat on the Center’s advisory board and was a strong supporter of its aim to promote public interest journalism and to stimulate discussion about journalism ethics.

ABOUT THE CENTER: The mission of the Center for Journalism Ethics is to encourage the highest standards in journalism ethics worldwide. We foster vigorous debate about ethical practices in journalism and provide a resource for producers, consumers and students of journalism. We honor the best in ethical journalistic practice and will not hesitate to call attention to journalistic failings. The Center is housed in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.